The Top 5 Things to Consider Before Consulting with a Divorce Attorney

None of us get married thinking that one day we will want a divorce. Most people begin marriages thinking that they will be with their spouse forever. Then, life happens. Some couples overcome difficult obstacles together, while others realize they are not compatible with their partner. After they reach a realization that the marriage is broken, they may begin to ponder about divorce. People divorce for many reasons, and a marriage that ends with a divorce is not necessarily a failed marriage. Navigating through a divorce without legal representation can be difficult—that is why there are divorce attorneys. Before consulting with a divorce attorney, there are five major questions to ask yourself:

pondering

  1. Am I emotionally ready for a divorce?

In Arizona, a divorce is called a “dissolution”—which legally ends a marriage. Putting legality aside, a divorce is the breaking apart of a partnership. Before a person decides to seek an attorney’s legal guidance, the person must be emotionally ready to end their marriage. A common question is: “How do you know when you’re ready to end things?” Truthfully, the answer is different for every person. You may be the party being served with divorce papers and not prepared to end the marriage. Arizona does not require both parties to consent to a divorce. Once one party feels a divorce is necessary, the process to dissolve the marriage can commence. Even if you are not ready to proceed with a divorce, emotions must be set aside to reach the best outcome for all parties involved. A divorce should be treated as a business transaction with your attorney and a social transaction with a counselor—who will be better equipped to help you through the lifestyle adjustments.

  1. Am I financially ready for a divorce?

If you are seriously thinking about divorce, do not let the financial aspect keep you from proceeding with the case. You should learn what assets and/or debts you and your spouse have acquired, and what support may need to be paid or requested by putting together a budget. Some people are afraid of being “frozen out” during divorce proceedings. In Arizona, the system is set up in a way for the lower-earning spouse to have the same protection as the high-earning spouse. Before a final judgment is made, the judge can issue temporary orders that require the higher-earning spouse to pay spousal maintenance during the case. Spousal maintenance payments can even continue after the proceedings end if one of the party requires financial assistance. A judge can also order one party to pay the other spouse’s attorney fees, either because one party is in a stronger financial position or because one of the parties acts unreasonably during the dissolution process.  Note, however, that a good attorney will never promise a fees award or spousal maintenance because these are some of the most unsettled and unpredictable areas of family law.

  1. Have I researched attorneys?

It is important to research attorneys before deciding to have a consultation. Some helpful
websites are avvo.com and azbar.org. Take an attorney’s experience, client testimonials, paper and fees into account. Sometimes it is necessary to go to multiple consultations to find the right attorney. Remember that attorneys have different styles, and it is crucial to choose an attorney with whom you are comfortable.

  1. What should I take to my consultation?

Depending on your situation, it is important to take relevant documents to your consultation. If you have already began filling out paperwork using the “Self-service
center” from the Maricopa Superior Court website, make sure to take any and all forms. Also take a pen and paper to take notes during the meeting to reference later. You should
remember to take your driver’s license and the consultation fee (if the attorney requires one). Have questions for your attorney written down so you do not waste time trying to remember them. Most of all, bring a good attitude.  A good attorney will be honest and point out both the strengths and weaknesses of your position and may offer some ‘tough love’ advice, if necessary.

  1. Do I have specific questions ready to ask the attorney?

Initial client consultations are usually less than an hour. That means you have a very short amount of time to explain your situation to an attorney, determine whether the attorney’s personality and advice aligns with your goals, and determine whether the attorney can help you with your legal issues. In that compressed time frame, you must be concise, goal-oriented, and open to hearing both good and bad news. Having specific questions already prepared before an attorney consultation will allow you to get the most out of your brief time, but be prepared to deviate from your script if the attorney points out issues you may not have considered.

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